Bodyweight for women

What’s different about women’s bodyweight training?

The bodyweight fitness industry has been created by men, for men. It’s full of lean, muscular guys and is as much about that image as it is about the movements.

My goal is to change that. I want bodyweight fitness to be an environment where I feel comfortable having more than 20% body fat.

I want to know that I can be any shape or size and still belong.

Exercise optimized for women

Aside from the image of bodyweight training, women are not simply little men. Physically, hormonally, and psychologically, we are different.

Bodyweight workouts designed for women have better results

I’m not saying that we can’t use a program designed for a guy and have good results with it.

But coaching women with awareness of these differences can give GREAT results.

One size doesn't fit all

I give personalized feedback in all my classes and workshops, and in my online handstand group
(Oh, and I do coach some brave men, too!)

Strength is relative

When it comes to pure strength, studies show that men are almost twice as strong as women in their upper bodies.

However, when we look at relative strength (strength per kg of weight), the difference in strength is much less.

For their body weight many women can be just as strong as men!

Anatomy and centre of mass

Women have hips and breasts. I was not the first person to discover this, but it can have a significant impact on balance as well as technique for a variety of movements.

The Big Butt Theory

Women have a lower centre of mass. Men typically have more upper body strength and size, whereas women carry a lot of their weight in their hips and thighs.

And this is where my Big Butt Theory comes in. I wrote an entire article on how this affects women's bodyweight training.

Strong women, body fat and health

One slightly limiting factor for women is that we naturally carry more body fat than men. I’m always hesitant to bring up the fact that the leaner you are, the easier bodyweight training is.

Leaner is not always better

As women we are bombarded with people telling us that we need to look a certain way or weigh a certain amount. But for women, leaner is definitely not always better when trying to be healthy.

Growing up as a gymnast, there was always pressure to be thinner. Ironically, 20 years later I am in many ways stronger now at 140lbs than I was as a teenager.

So as women it’s not simply about being as lean as possible. It’s about being as strong as possible in the body that you have.